Build a SQL task

Airplane makes it incredibly easy to take simple SQL queries and turn them into apps ("tasks") that you and your teammates can use.
In this guide, we'll create SQL tasks to search and edit users in a demo database.

Before you begin

If you haven't yet, first install the Airplane CLI by following the instructions at Installing the CLI. (If you have already installed the Airplane CLI, ensure you have the latest version by Upgrading the CLI.)

Create a Demo DB

If you haven't yet, you'll need a demo database for this task. Assuming you have the CLI installed, you can run:
shell
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airplane demo create-db
This will create a DB with tables including users and accounts:
users
  • id integer
  • name text
  • title text
  • email text
  • account_id integer
accounts
  • id integer
  • company_name text
  • country text

Create a SQL task to search users

To create a SQL task, you can init from the CLI. For this guide, we recommend running init from a new, empty directory.
shell
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# mkdir airplane-getting-started
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# cd airplane-getting-started
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airplane tasks init
You'll be prompted for details. Make sure to choose SQL for the kind of task.
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? What should this task be called?
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> Search users
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? What kind of task should this be?
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> SQL
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? Where is the script for this task?
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> search_users.sql
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? Where should the definition file be created?
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> search_users.task.yaml
You can edit search_users.sql to specify a SQL query:
sql
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-- search_users.sql
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select * from users
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join accounts on accounts.id = users.account_id
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where users.name ILIKE :search
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or users.title ILIKE :search
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or users.email ILIKE :search
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or accounts.company_name ILIKE :search
This query performs a search over user and the user's account using ilike for case-insensitive matching. We've specified :search above - this is a query argument that we'll fill in separately. Edit search_users.task.yaml to configure:
yaml
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# search_users.task.yaml
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# Task slug uniquely identifies the task and is used in places like views
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slug: search_users
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name: Search users
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parameters:
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- name: Query
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slug: query
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type: shorttext
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required: false
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sql:
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resource: "[Demo DB]"
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entrypoint: search_users.sql
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queryArgs:
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search: "%{{params.query}}%"
  • This task takes in a parameter of query, which is what a user might enter.
  • The :search argument is set in queryArgs - you can interpolate in values like parameters, and configs here using {{ }} syntax. (The % is a SQL syntax for wildcard matching.)
  • query is optional (required: false). If no query is set, %{{params.query}}% evaluates to %% and search matches all values.

Deploy your task

You can deploy the task via the CLI:
shell
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airplane deploy search_users.task.yaml
Once deployed, find the task in your Library to see your task in action!
That's it! Try executing a search for alex:

Create a SQL task to update

Similarly, let's create a second SQL task to edit a user.
shell
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airplane tasks init
Call this task "Update user":
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? What should this task be called?
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> Update user
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? What kind of task should this be?
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> SQL
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? Where is the script for this task?
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> update_user.sql
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? Where should the definition file be created?
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> update_user.task.yaml
This time, we'll execute an update query:
sql
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-- update_user.sql
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execute users
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set name = :name, email = :email
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where id = :user_id
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returning *
With the following task definition:
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# update_user.task.yaml
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slug: update_user
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name: Update user
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parameters:
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- slug: user_id
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name: User ID
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type: integer
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- slug: name
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name: Name
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type: shorttext
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- slug: email
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name: Email
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type: shorttext
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sql:
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resource: "[Demo DB]"
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entrypoint: update_user.sql
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queryArgs:
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user_id: "{{params.user_id}}"
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name: "{{params.name}}"
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email: "{{params.email}}"

Deploy the second task

You can deploy this like the other task:
shell
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airplane deploy update_user.task.yaml
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# Or, pass in a directory and airplane will discover tasks:
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airplane deploy .
Because we're returning in the SQL query, we can get back the updated version of the user in our task output:

Wrapping up

That's it! It took just a few simple commands to deploy your first two tasks to Airplane.